The Concept of Aging and Why We Lose Muscle Mass When We Age

Scientists investigating gut bacteria have found that the gut bacteria metabolite, UrolithinA holds significant promise of muscle recovery in aging adults. The researchers suggest that UrolithinA supplements would benefit people who are unable to get enough exercise due to poor muscle health or illness.

But, why does muscles grow weak when we age?

As people grow older, they tend to lose muscle mass, strength and endurance. Aging cells progressively lose their capacity for mitophagy; the breakdown and recycling of faulty mitochondria. In skeletal muscle, decreased performance and increased fatigue are associated with a decline in the efficiency of mitochondria, which are the “batteries” or “power stations” of cells. According to Professor David Marcinek, a professor of radiology at the University Of Washington School Of Medicine in Seattle, failing mitochondria is one way that muscles become less functional as we age.

UrolithinA to the Rescue

Naturally occurring UrolithinA supports mitochondria rejuvenation. Previous studies show that UrolithinA can stimulate mitophagy and improve muscle function in aging animals and models of muscular dystrophy. Naturally occurring UrolithinA is produced by bacteria in the gut when they breakdown the polyphenols found in pomegranates, berries and nuts. But because this may not be in sufficient quantity in some adults, UrolithinA supplements may provide an alternative way to stimulate mitophagy in older people and help them maintain their strength and endurance as they age.

Physical Therapy as a method for Strength Building

Wondering how physical therapy can help you retain youthful strength and muscle recovery, call Jason Ferine Physical Therapy at 424-365-2083 to schedule an evaluation. At Jason Ferine Physical Therapy, we are firm believers in the healing power of human touch and we focus our treatments around hands-on manual therapy, strength training, yoga, exercise, and acupuncture.

 

Jason Ferine Physical Therapy

2300 Westwood Blvd, Ste. 100
Los Angeles, CA 90064
Tel: 424-365-2083
Fax: 310-943-3532

Email: jfptoffice@gmail.com or jasonferinept@gmail.com